My Son Is Type 1

When I first set up this blog I needed a tag line representing its purpose: “A blog for the love of interior decorating. And life in general. But mainly decorating.” I get bored easily so I thought I’d take a lite break in the light series and do something on life in general.

I used to naively think that as my three sons got older I’d worry less about them than I did when they were little. Truth is, I find myself praying for them now more than ever. As a mom, it’s in my nature to want to protect my sons from the hurts and trials of life that I know they will encounter.

A few years ago my oldest son at the age of 23 was diagnosed as a type 1 (Juvenile) diabetic. I remember the day he called to tell me he found out why he had been sick for several weeks, lost significant weight and had battled severe leg cramps. Doing what most mammas would do, I cried and wished I wasn’t several states away so I could hug and hold my grown up boy while the seriousness of what he was facing sunk in. My son is blessed with a wife whose mom and sister are in the medical profession and they were a huge benefit to him as he made the necessary adjustments. While it’s not been easy, my son has adapted well to the disease and his wife is a true helpmate in every sense of the word.

I really didn’t have an understanding of type 1 diabetes so I’ve been making it a point to educate myself on the subject. For instance, I thought only infants and young children were diagnosed with Juvenile Diabetes but statistics are showing more and  more young adults also being diagnosed. I also learned that of the nearly 19 million people in the United States (young to old) who have diabetes, only 5% of that 19 million is type 1 (statistics from the American Diabetes Association). I have been gaining a better understanding that proper type 1 diabetes management is composed of a handful of elements: blood glucose control and insulin management, exercise, nutrition and support. Because my son was an adult when diagnosed, he is responsible for his own management. What I can do is offer the support piece through encouraging, loving and praying. Plus the continuation of my own education process is important because ignorance can make the best intentioned person sound stupid. My son told me that just last week, a woman in her desire to be helpful, encouraged him to get the lap band to help control his diabetes. Ummm, seriously? The boy weighs a whopping 169 pounds and has type 1, not type 2 diabetes. It goes back to education.

There are several informative sites about Juvenile Diabetes. The  Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation (jdrf.org) is a great resource along with the American Diabetes Association (diabetes.org). There are also numerous support groups and blogs specific to Type 1 Diabetes. Just Google it.

      

Above all, I am daily reminded to cherish those who are most important and have determined to never take the precious things of life for granted.

From my heart 🙂

Becky Pickrel


3 Responses to “My Son Is Type 1”

  1. Nan

    I pray for Rayan every day .Having had a touch of Diabetes when i was down with my heart attact, I realized I didn’t know much, I have learned a lot but much more to go, I’m one of the lucky ones ,I have gotten better, no shots or medican.need to watch my diet. Rayan is so blessed to have a great loving family. We all need to be more about Type 1 and Type 2 Diabetes. Thank You.Becky.

    Reply
  2. Marguerite Remington

    What a heart felt piece Becky. Made me realize that I don’t know that much about type 1 Diabetes. But I can learn. Support by prayer I can do also.

    Reply

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